Flourishing in its own right, coming
together in powerful new ways

AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript + XML) is a rapidly emerging programming technique that attracts lots of attention nowadays. The improved interactivity of AJAX-powered interfaces bridges the traditional gap between Desktop and Web applications. Ability to mash-up services or functionality in a rich client allows building powerful new or improving existing web software. Well-applied AJAX is a definite advantage for any kind of web application - from simple sites to complex and sophisticated business applications.

AJAX + SOA: Added Value for Enterprise Applications

Rich web interfaces add more value to next-generation enterprise applications designed on the progressive Services Oriented Architecture (SOA). AJAX is the advanced interface technology providing extended visual service, desktop interactivity and functionality. It adds value to SOA through better user interaction with both remote (internet, extranet) and local (intranet) enterprise applications. Adding RIA (Rich Internet Application) to existing enterprise IT infrastructure presents several benefits including operation cost savings, better control over document circulation and improved security.




An Ajax application eliminates the start-stop-start-stop nature of interaction on the Web by introducing an intermediary - an Ajax engine - between the user and the server. It seems like adding a layer to the application would make it less responsive, but the opposite is true. Instead of loading a webpage, at the start of the session, the browser loads an Ajax engine - written in JavaScript and usually tucked away in a hidden frame. This engine is responsible for both rendering the interface the user sees and communicating with the server on the user's behalf. The Ajax engine allows the user's interaction with the application to happen asynchronously - independent of communication with the server. So the user is never staring at a blank browser window and an hourglass icon, waiting around for the server to do something.

Every user action that normally would generate an HTTP request takes the form of a JavaScript call to the Ajax engine instead. Any response to a user action that doesn't require a trip back to the server - such as simple data validation, editing data in memory, and even some navigation - the engine handles on its own. If the engine needs something from the server in order to respond - if it's submitting data for processing, loading additional interface code, or retrieving new data - the engine makes those requests asynchronously, usually using XML, without stalling a user's interaction with the application.

While developing web user interfaces we supports the leading industry standards and browser technologies. Cross Browser Support: Internet Explorer 6+, Mozilla FireFox 1.0+, Opera 9+, Safari 2+ and others Compatibility: Compliance with W3C standards: XHTML 1.0 or HTML 4.01., CSS 2.1 Accessibility: Section 508 standard and W3C WCAG compatibility



Google is making a huge investment in developing the Ajax approach. All of the major products Google has introduced over the last year - Orkut, Gmail, the latest beta version of Google Groups, Google Suggest, and Google Maps - are Ajax applications. (For more on the technical nuts and bolts of these Ajax implementations, check out these excellent analyses of Gmail, Google Suggest, and Google Maps.) Others are following suit: many of the features that people love in Flickr depend on Ajax, and Amazon's A9.com search engine applies similar techniques.

These projects demonstrate that Ajax is not only technically sound, but also practical for real-world applications. This isn't another technology that only works in a laboratory. And Ajax applications can be any size, from the very simple, single-function Google Suggest to the very complex and sophisticated Google Maps.

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